Description
Creator
Francis Towne (1739 - 1816)
Title(s)
  • The Wrekin
  • The Wrekin from the road from Wenlock to Shrewsbury
  • The Wrekin in ditto [Shropshire] going off of a storm
Date
1777
Medium
Pencil (?), watercolour, on Whatman paper
Dimensions
  • image height 216mm,
  • image length 274mm
Support
on Whatman paper
Inscription
  • sheet, recto, lower right
  • “F.Towne. delt / No.2 1777”
Inscription
  • sheet, verso
  • “The Wrekin from the road from Wenlock to Shrewsbury”
Object Type
Watercolour

Collection
Versions
A View of the Wrekin, Shropshire, Private Collection
The Wrekin, on the road between Wenlock and Shrewsbury, Private Collection
Catalogue Number
FT067
Description Sources
Phillips records (image)

Provenance

Untraced until exhibited at Walker’s Galleries in 1949; even so, it was owned by Spink & Son by 10 October 1949, when it was sold to Agnew’s (no.6042) for £55; it does not feature in Spink’s records, which are patchy for the 1940s. On 7 November 1949 Agnew’s sold it for £75 to Mrs Scott Mason. It was sold at Phillips on 23 March 1970, lot 54, to Leger Galleries, who sold it in November 1970, whereafter it is untraced.

Associated People & Organisations

Untraced, November 1970
Leger Galleries, 23 March 1970
Phillips, 23 March 1970, lot 54
Mrs E. M. Scott-Mason, 7 November 1949, GBP 75
Thomas Agnew & Sons, London, 7 November 1949, GBP 55, no. 6042
Spink & Son, London, London, 10 October 1949
Walker's Galleries, London, 1949
Exhibition History
[?] Exhibition of Original Drawings at the Gallery, No.20 Lower Brook Street, Grosvenor Square, 20 Lower Brook Street, 1805, no. 20 or 21 as 'The Wrekin in ditto [Shropshire] going off of a storm'
unidentified exhibition, Walker's Galleries, 1949, no. 148

Comment

The Wrekin is a hill seen to the right of the road when travelling towards Shrewsbury. Towne made a version of this drawing dated 1783 (FT397), with which another, unfinished sketch is probably associated (FT398). Two views of the Wrekin were exhibited in 1805 with the same title, and as only one composition is now known, a second must have existed (FT068).

by Richard Stephens

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